Artist

Annie Turner

Annie Turner

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

 

 

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner’s sculpture is imprinted with the river Deben’s past and present, the cycles of nature and the interaction of man. These are, as she puts it ‘objects that trigger the memory’, as much collective memory as personal recollection.

These encrusted forms – families of spoons, sinkers, ladders, sluices, and so on – reveal the particular texture and weather of this waterland, the character of its beds and inlets, the colour of its reflected sky.

The richly layered Meander bowls, impressed with the fragments and detritus Turner has found on innumerable walks, are small in scale but encapsulate so much about the broader landscape – a tidal geography concentrated and made intimate.

David Whiting

Annie Turner

Annie Turner
Annie Turner
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