Zoe Arnold

Fish

Factory

Gambling

Eggs

Peas.

Scales.

Kinetic correspondence.
Beneath the above.
Shadow.

Mistress.

Can the lark light the day?
Star child.

Granary loaf.

Kinetic correspondence.

Spoon dance.

This one deserved a story.
Sewing kit.

Orbits

Orrery

Mimic mirror movements.
Rust

Rain collector.

Silver hair.

Milk teeth.

Beneath the above.

The scratchings of scholars.
Self portrait.

Cup and saucer.

Asylum

Gilded cage.

Bravery,

Courage.

Fear,

Nightmares

Conscience.

The conscience of kings
The broken windmill.
Apple

Appal

Conscience caravan

Park at your convenience.
Stop when I say stop.

Introduction needed!!!!

 

 

ARNOLD
Fish
Factory
Gambling
Eggs
Peas.
Scales.
Kinetic correspondence. Beneath the above. Shadow.
Mistress.
Can the lark light the day? Star child.
Granary loaf.
Kinetic correspondence.

Spoon dance.
This one deserved a story. Sewing kit.
Orbits
Orrery
Mimic mirror movements. Rust
Rain collector.
Silver hair.
Milk teeth.
Beneath the above.
The scratchings of scholars. Self portrait.
Cup and saucer.

Asylum
Gilded cage.
Bravery,
Courage.
Fear,
Nightmares
Conscience.
The conscience of kings The broken windmill. Apple
Appal
Conscience caravan
Park at your convenience. Stop when I say stop.

CASSON

To create this ‘world of beings’ I want to combine the immediacy of my drawn ideas and observation with the time-consuming process of making. To conjure a process that allows spontaneity, I create many characters until there is a ‘crowd of figures’ that will, in another moment, find their stories, among the found objects and with each other. The slight separation of the ‘beings’ from the scenarios they will inhabit gives me space for surprise; ideas and making can then spring back and forth at the same time.
FOK
I follow my own instincts when I am making my jewellery pieces and I spend a lot of time looking at common objects, particularly in the natural world, and love to discover hidden surprises. Looking deeper I discover weird and wonderful organic structural geometry, the pecking order employed by the wonders of nature and the delightful colours that come with it.
By gathering all these ingredients just like cooking a meal I have the fun of making it. When its done I have the pleasure of sharing it with others.
HANID
The essence of movement in water is the inspiration for my work. Water is synonymous with nature, human beings and love in all its physical and metaphorical representations. In water there is an endless range of forms and patterns, each with its own unique and intricate beauty, never repeating, giving me an infinite visual language with which to express my ideas.
I find silver the ideal medium to work in
as it is sensitive to heat, moisture, movement and emotion, and is multi-dimensional just as water is. It reflects 98 per cent of light and can look transparent, so it is the perfect material for representing water.
I create the forms in silver using embossing techniques such as chasing, repoussé and forming to push the silver into contours with a series of punches. I use wide nylon punches to push deep curves into the silver and fine steel punches to create defined patterns.

HENSHAW

A love for narrative forms is key to my work; stories and sayings, passed down through generations, always with a moral tale. It is the stereotypical animal characters that I enjoy the most: the cunning fox, who is often outwitted, the wise stork, or the stupid hen. I also seek inspiration from 18th-century tapestries and prints, a pre-camera era, where animals were quirkily represented.
With the freedom she allows Linda is a generous patron. This enables me to grow as a maker. She encourages me to take my work to a new level and has confidence that what I produce will be successful.

KEELER
Ever since I started making pottery fifty-five years ago, I have drawn inspiration from the past. Old pots speak so eloquently of their maker, his materials and his skills, and reflect his time and culture. Inevitably this is true of my work too.
I hope to infect my audience with my fulfilling obsessions, and at the same time challenge and amuse them with pots that they use in their daily lives. Pottery is seldom credited with its true cultural and intellectual weight, it can so easily be coaxed towards the celebrated world of fine art, away from its place at the heart of civilisation. I remain undeterred: a potter.


MARSHALL
(1967–1992)
The bottom line is I create because I am able to; I have the time, means and inclination; it gives purpose and is the way I hope to communicate a sense of being.
I suppose what I am searching for can be broadly summed up as a communication for universal human values to stir emotions!
My work, of course, is only part of my life, but it is the vehicle I have chosen, to try and gain a better understanding of the world around me in the same way as it may be possible to achieve a broad feeling of the whole by studying the parts.
I have more questions than answers, and because of this I have found it very difficult to express such a complex subject in clear terms. It is also not a static thing and will undoubtedly change.
Text reprinted courtesy of Edward Marshall Trust.

NEAL
My furniture design studio was established in 2002 and is currently located in the heart of North East London.
The studio’s varied spectrum of business ranges from individual pieces for the international collectors market, to bespoke commissions for private clients, to the design of production pieces for industry.
I am also researching, through Brighton University, the relationships between traditional processes and digital manufacture, evolving designs that intuitively engage with tacit qualities embedded within materials, processes, and function.
In Pursuit of Carbon Neutral was a 10 day project in 2012 in which I challenged myself and the mass production methods within the furni- ture Industry, from the factory/workshop setting to the delivery itself. By using a workshop, set up in the woods, and cycling to and from the woodland, I collected data to calculate the carbon output of the whole process from start to finish.
The purpose of this exercise was to highlight the importance of provenance in relation to materials and local production, and encourage consumers and manufacturers to consider the related carbon footprint embedded within the products they buy or manufacture.


RIGLER
The language of architectural ornament surrounds us, and ubiquity renders it near- invisible. Yet from austere Modernism to flamboyant Gothic, it can reveal much about the myths and narratives of power. What signs and symbols denote an important building or object? Who makes those judgements, and what values do they hold?
Thoughts of ruined and abandoned places, romantic landscapes and faded post-war utopias inform my recent sculptures. By exploring clashes of style and scale, I’m trying to explore the meanings hidden beneath the architectural surface.
I am delighted to be returning to Chatsworth for this newest work. In that extraordinary collection are fascinating glimpses of lost places and people. The Chinese coromandel lacquer chests in the State Drawing Room, built from the obsolete remains of a sumptuous wall panelling for the Closet Room, reminds me that such grand houses were never static: they have a long history of shedding their skins.

 

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